Managing Caregiver Isolation during COVID-19

Managing Caregiver Isolation during COVID-19

Many people who care for a family member with dementia are accustomed to feeling isolated in their experience; of being the only one who knows what they are going through. COVID-19 adds a new layer onto the isolation that care partners may already be feeling. Responding to concerns shared by family caregivers in our Caregiver Check-In live online event, Dr. Sadavoy provides insight, perspective and some strategies for managing isolation.

When friends and family don’t understand the impact of dementia caregiving

When friends and family don’t understand the impact of dementia caregiving

When a person in your life is first diagnosed with dementia, it can be an overwhelming, frightening and isolating experience for you, the care partner. It can be additionally difficult for family or friends who haven’t witnessed these changes over time to understand or recognize the challenges that you’ve been facing. Our video and blog explores perspective and coping strategies.

When the person with dementia doesn’t know they have limitations – Anosognosia

When the person with dementia doesn’t know they have limitations – Anosognosia

Doesn’t the person know that they have dementia? They may not. What can be perceived as denial or being stubborn can actually be a lack of awareness that there are any deficits. The medical term for this is “anosognosia” and it means “without knowledge of disease”. When anosognosia occurs there is a limited ability to have insight into ones true abilities. As a result, the person you are caring for may not be able recognize the symptoms of dementia. So as a caregiver/ partner, how do you cope?

Driving and Dementia from the family caregiver’s perspective

Driving and Dementia from the family caregiver’s perspective

Driving is one of the most challenging and emotionally charged aspects of dementia. While older individuals can drive safely, those with dementia generally cannot. Dementia gradually erodes key areas of function necessary for safe driving. These area include response times, judgement, problem solving skills, and sense of direction.

Dementia Caregiving and the Holidays

Dementia Caregiving and the Holidays

The holidays are often a special time for families, including meaningful traditions and get-togethers. When one family member has a diagnosis of dementia, caregivers question how to enjoy the season in a special way for everyone. But there are ways to adapt celebrations so that everyone is able to enjoy the holidays together. Consider these eight (8) tips by Dr. Rhonda Feldman.

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